Missing males and waiting for kids

As birthing season approaches, I have been watching intently for signs of baby rattlesnakes. While postpartum mothers usually stay inside their shelters, the neonates are typically active and easily spotted. Although they do not leave their shelters before shedding the first time, babies can usually be seen crawling or basking at the entrance. And when we introduce the BurrowCam into the shelter, the kids can be seen exploring their new surroundings and crawling around on their mother. So far, there’s been no evidence of babies yet this year. This would be a bit early but quick warming last spring has me wondering about the potential for early births this year.

Remember that pregnant female rattlesnakes in our area hangout in carefully selected thermal shelters where they can maintain consistently warm body temperatures around the clock until they give birth. This period of thermoregulation lasts several months, during which the pregnant moms do not forage for food.

All five of our telemetered females are apparently pregnant, plus Female 55, who was processed and released without a transmitter in June (no transmitter surgery due to some old but significant trauma to her abdomen; click here for details). These females settled into their gestation shelters between 8 June and 1 July and have maintained body temperatures between 28ºC and 32ºC (82º–90ºF), almost without exception, ever since.

In fact, at dawn on a recent cool morning (16 August) when the ground temperature just before sunrise was in the mid-50s F, these girls still had body temps in the high 80s F. They maintain similar body temps during hot afternoons when the ground temperature (much hotter in the sun than air temp) outside is 120ºF and more. They thermoregulate like this by selecting logs or large rocks that have just the right thickness and sun exposure to stay warm at night but not get too hot in the afternoon sun. Such places are apparently scarce because three of our telemetered females are together in one shelter, while Female 41 is with non-telemetered Female 55 in another. Female 54 is in a third location, possibly by herself, but there could be others in there without radios. Females 39 and 41, both of whom produced broods in 2014, are in the same shelters as last year.

Flash photo of Female 41, tucked into her gestation refuge at sunrise on 16 August 2015. Note in the inset how her scales are pulled apart by her developing brood. Female 55 is also in this shelter but not visible on this morning.
Flash photo of Female 41, tucked into her gestation refuge at sunrise on 16 August 2015. Note in the inset how her scales are pulled apart by her developing brood. Female 55 is also in this shelter but not visible on this morning.

On 27 August, the BurrowCam revealed Female 39’s abdomen to be greatly distended, extending all the way to the cloaca. So maybe delivery of her 2015 brood is not far off? The frame grab (below) from the BurrowCam video shows her abdominal scales pulled far apart. In the 50-second video (watch here), you’ll see what I see when we thread the BurrowCam into a passage. Female 39 is identified by red/blue (red-over-blue) paint in her rattle and the edge of another dark gray rattlesnake appears to be visible under 39’s coils. Known to be behind her in the passage (because of their radio signals) are Females 47 and 53, as well as Male 46. Additionally, in recent days, I have seen non-telemetered (and non-pregnant) Female 48 (green/green) and Male 36 (red/red; carrying a failed transmitter) in this log. It’s a popular place this time of year!

Frame grab from a 27 August BurrowCam video of the distended abdomen of telemetered Female 39, deep in her gestation refuge.
Frame grab from a 27 August BurrowCam video showing the distended abdomen of telemetered Female 39, deep in her gestation refuge.

As you may recall, Males 36 and 37 have been missing for months since their transmitters failed prematurely in September and December, respectively. Until last week, Male 36 had been last seen on the BurrowCam in a hollow log courting postpartum Female 41 on 2 October 2014, and I last saw Male 37 as his tail disappeared down a hole on 7 March 2015. There had been no sign of either of them since until a fellow photographer and herpetologist I encounter frequently at Effie Yeaw showed me a photo of Male 37 (IDed by his yellow/red rattle marking) crossing a trail on 20 August! Then, just 5 days later, while checking for babies in the shelter with Females 39, 47 and 54, and Male 46, I was surprised to see Male 36’s red/red rattle. (See photos below) So both are alive and well… but both still elude recapture.

Male36 (red/red paint in rattle) deep inside a hollow log with Female 41 on 02 October 2014.
Male36 (red/red paint in rattle) deep inside a hollow log with Female 41 on 02 October 2014.

 

Male 36 inside another hollow log on 25 August 2015 with at least three pregnant females and a smaller male. Compared to the 2 October photo (above), note that he has two additional rattle segments between the paint and the live black segment, indicating he has shed twice in the past ten months.
Male 36 inside another hollow log on 25 August 2015 with at least three pregnant females and a smaller male. Compared to the 2 October photo (above), note that he has two additional rattle segments between the paint and the live black segment, indicating he has shed twice in the past ten months.

Earlier today, 29 August, I found Male 46 coiled in poison oak dozens of meters away from the log where he has been hanging out with the three pregnant girls continuously for the past two weeks. It is likely he has been chased off by a larger male, so maybe Male 36 is still in there. This refuge has a narrow deep passage that is nearly impossible to thread the BurrowCam into and, even when successful, I can usually only see whichever rattlesnake is closest to the top (for example, the 50-second video of Female 39, with the link earlier in this post).

So Baby Watch continues and I still hope to recapture missing Males 36 and 37.

2 thoughts on “Missing males and waiting for kids”

  1. Thank you for this super-interesting post, Mike. I came across a Rattler on the River Bend PArk side of the river the other weekend, and was surprised to see it sitting out in the open in the picnic area. Maybe it had been kicked out by a larger male? You alway give me something to think about…

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